Kenneth B. and Mamie P. Clark Fund

$10,000 to support research and demonstration activities that promote the understanding of the relationship between self-identity and academic achievement with an emphasis on children in grade levels K-8.

Deadline:

Sponsor: APF

Description

The Kenneth B. and Mamie P. Clark Fund, supports research and demonstration activities that promote the understanding of the relationship between self-identity and academic achievement with an emphasis on children in grade levels K-8. This grant will alternate every other year between an early career psychologist and a graduate student. The 2018 grant will support an early career psychologist (no more than ten years post-doctoral).

The Kenneth B. and Mamie P. Clark Fund was established in 2003 to honor the Clarks and to perpetuate their work as pioneers in understanding the psychological underpinnings of race relations and in addressing social issues such as segregation and injustice.

The Clarks were the first and second African-Americans to receive PhDs from Columbia University. Their famous doll experiments, in which they asked children to express their likes and dislikes about brown-and white-skinned dolls, led the Clarks to conclude that the segregation in schools and society was psychologically damaging to the children. These studies are believed to be the first social science evidence considered as hard fact by the U.S. Supreme court, in Brown v. The Board of Education of Topeka.

The goal is to raise $1 million for this fund. Thanks to the Turrell Fund, the Foundation for Child Development and the many generous individuals, the fund currently holds more than $250,000.

Support research in psychology: Donate to this fund.

Evaluation Criteria 

Proposals will be evaluated on: 

  • Conformance with stated program goals and qualifications.
  • Quality and potential impact of proposed work.
  • Originality, innovation and contribution to the field with proposed project.
  • Applicant’s demonstrated competence and capability to execute the proposed work. 
  • Allocation of resources and criticality of funding for execution of work (particularly if part of a larger funded effort).
Eligibility

One $10,000 research grant is available.

Applicants must meet the following criteria:

  • Be an early career psychologist (no more than ten years post-doctoral).
  • Familiarity with the Clarks' work is essential:
    1. Kenneth Bancroft Clark, Library of Congress, Manuscript Division, Washington, D.C.
    2. Mamie Phipps Clark, Manuscripts Division, New York Public Library, New York.
    3. Markowitz, G. & Rosner, D. (1996). Children, Race and Power: Kenneth and Mamie Clark's Northside Center. Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia.
How to Apply

How to Apply

Please be advised that APF does not provide feedback to applicants on their proposals. 

Proposal Requirements

Please include the following in a single document (Not to exceed five pages, one-inch margins, 11-point Times New Roman/Garamond Font, single space):

  • Goals, relevant background/literature review.
  • Methods (must be detailed enough so that the design, assessments, and procedures can be evaluated).
  • Anticipated outcomes, significance and impact.

Additionally, please submit the following documents:

  • Project timeline (not to exceed one page; typically, APF grants are for one year).
  • Detailed budget and justification (not to exceed one page).
  • Abbreviated CV (not to exceed five pages).

APF does not allow institutional indirect costs or overhead costs. Applicants may use grant monies for direct administrative costs of their proposed project.

Past Recipients
2017

Hyesung Grace Hwang, Washington University in St. Louis

2016

May Ling Dodge Halim, PhD, California State University, Long Beach

2015

Krystal Thomas, Virginia Commonwealth University

2014

Saskias Casanova, PhD, Arizona State University 

2013

Yamanda Wright, University of Texas at Austin
"Racial Mistrust, Perceptions of Discrimination, and Academic Achievement Among African American and European American Children"

2012

Michael Strambler, Yale University